OVERVIEW

About 10,000 people are diagnosed with bladder cancer every year and it’s the seventh most common cancer in the UK.

The condition is more common in older adults, with more than half of all new cases diagnosed in people aged 75 and above.

Bladder cancer is also more common in men than in women, possibly because in the past, men were more likely to smoke and work in the manufacturing industry.

If you have symptoms of bladder cancer, such as blood in your urine, you should see your GP without delay.

Your GP may ask about your symptoms, family history and whether you’ve been exposed to any possible causes of bladder cancer, such as smoking.

In some cases, your GP may request a urine sample, so it can be tested in a laboratory for traces of blood, bacteria or abnormal cells.

Your GP may also carry out a physical examination of your rectum and vagina, as bladder cancer sometimes causes a noticeable lump that presses against them.

If your doctor suspects bladder cancer, you’ll be referred to a hospital for further tests.

USEFUL INFORMATION IS FOUND ON THIS NHS WEBSITE