Link here to an article in The Mail on Sunday on 18 December 2016
 Also:
Testimonial of an 85 years young patient from the UK
Thanks to iTind I have had a very good year visiting perhaps 15 different countries over 13 weeks without any difficulties. Please convey my thanks to Ido Kilemnik (iTind inventor and Medi-Tate CEO) for his work and determination – it is 60 years or so since I was involved in machining stainless and other nitinol like materials so I can partially appreciate his efforts.
His detailed letter continues:
Life Before iTind
During a cruise around six years ago I had to leave the dining room 4 times to visit the toilet during the 90 minute dinner.
I tolerated increasing BHP for around 4 years or so before seeking medical advice. The first treatment offered was drugs that did work but caused significant side effects. Around 4 years ago I contemplated the ‘Gold Standard’ Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP)… There are now alternatives to cutting such as laser, microwave or hotwire burning but these have similar possible side effects of temporary or possibly permanent incontinence, impotence and retrograde (dry) ejaculation.
I finally decided that the cure for my BPH had to be non-chemical and non-ablative. I then investigated non-ablative operations for a cure and had a stent type of operation which was performed in March 2015.
The Procedure
The period when the iTind is in position is perhaps best described as being a little uncomfortable. I was careful not to exercise or lift anything heavy in case the iTind became displaced. On sitting down in a low armchair the iTind gave rise to a minimal discomfort feeling. Obviously there was some soreness and urine control was a little difficult with some leakage and blood which gradually abated. I was somewhat glad when removal day arrived but in comparison with the same period after a TURP operation it was probably heaven.
The removal of the device 7 days later on 13 March followed a similar pattern and was accomplished without difficulty.
It is quite remarkable at the age of 84 that after both prostate operations I was able to walk about within half hour of awaking or de-anaesthetising and had no other ill effects other than those given above. I did not venture out for a few days after the first operation but was very well with no adverse consequence. Remarkable. Note also that I live 100 miles distant from the UCLH and accomplished the taxi and coach journeys on the operation days without too much trouble.
Results
Urine Flow Prior to the operations in March 15, the maximum urine peak flow rate was 10.9ml/sec. The three post operation flow tests carried out on 12 May, 10 July and 18 Dec at a local hospital showed a considerable improvement. The procedure was slightly different as at each visit flow rate was measured three times by continually drinking water until urination was essential. After each test the residual volume was measured by ultrasound. The average maximum flow rate for each visit was 18 ml/s, 23ml/s and 16ml/s.
For interest my IPSS score on 13 May was 13 – a drop of 12 from roughly six months previous.
Quality of Life After iTind
Before iTind, urine flow necessitated the seating position and toilet visits were necessary around 14 times per day with perhaps 2 visits during the night. Most visits were of an urgent nature and sitting down was adopted to aid bladder emptying and the toilet visit interval was around one hour. A week or so after removal of the iTind the frequency had dropped to 9 plus and eight months after was around 8 per day.  Results would be even better with less diuretics such as tea, coffee and alcohol.
Finally as an indication of the improvement and as previously mentioned, on a holiday cruise around five years ago I had to visit the toilet 4 times during dinner lasting say 90 minutes.  Over the past year I have undertaken 3 cruises consisting of 5 weeks to Canada, 4 weeks in the Caribbean, Cuba, Mexico and 2 weeks in the Black sea plus recently 2 weeks in Madeira without any difficulties whatsoever including the flights, and by recollection without leaving the dining room once.
My message to BPH sufferers considering the iTind:
Go for it – you will live a much more convenient life!
This testimonial was sent to us by a patient who had an excellent experience and is typical for a majority of patients. As regards pain, it is important to know that some men complain of severe discomfort and also pain for the 5-7 days that the device is in place. Over-the-counter pain tablets are effective. The discomfort ends soon after the iTind is removed and BPH symptoms are greatly reduced with further improvement continuing over the following months. The vast majority of patients have no further problems.
To summarise, a man with BPH who chooses an iTind  will undergo a 5 minute procedure under sedation to fit it, then 5-7 days of discomfort before the device is removed. After that many trouble free years are to be expected.
In the worst scenario, if the symptoms are not relieved, any of the alternative treatments remain options.    
If you would like to discuss options for the procedure, do not hesitate to call Robin Penberthy at Genesis Medical on 020 8451 4100
Testimonial of an 85 years young patient from the UK
Thanks to iTind I have had a very good year visiting perhaps 15 different countries over 13 weeks without any difficulties. Please convey my thanks to Ido Kilemnik (iTind inventor and Medi-Tate CEO) for his work and determination – it is 60 years or so since I was involved in machining stainless and other nitinol like materials so I can partially appreciate his efforts.
His detailed letter continues:
Life Before iTind
During a cruise around six years ago I had to leave the dining room 4 times to visit the toilet during the 90 minute dinner.
I tolerated increasing BHP for around 4 years or so before seeking medical advice. The first treatment offered was drugs that did work but caused significant side effects. Around 4 years ago I contemplated the ‘Gold Standard’ Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP)… There are now alternatives to cutting such as laser, microwave or hotwire burning but these have similar possible side effects of temporary or possibly permanent incontinence, impotence and retrograde (dry) ejaculation.
I finally decided that the cure for my BPH had to be non-chemical and non-ablative. I then investigated non-ablative operations for a cure and had a stent type of operation which was performed in March 2015.
The Procedure
The period when the iTind is in position is perhaps best described as being a little uncomfortable. I was careful not to exercise or lift anything heavy in case the iTind became displaced. On sitting down in a low armchair the iTind gave rise to a minimal discomfort feeling. Obviously there was some soreness and urine control was a little difficult with some leakage and blood which gradually abated. I was somewhat glad when removal day arrived but in comparison with the same period after a TURP operation it was probably heaven.
The removal of the device 7 days later on 13 March followed a similar pattern and was accomplished without difficulty.
It is quite remarkable at the age of 84 that after both prostate operations I was able to walk about within half hour of awaking or de-anaesthetising and had no other ill effects other than those given above. I did not venture out for a few days after the first operation but was very well with no adverse consequence. Remarkable. Note also that I live 100 miles distant from the UCLH and accomplished the taxi and coach journeys on the operation days without too much trouble.
Results
Urine Flow Prior to the operations in March 15, the maximum urine peak flow rate was 10.9ml/sec. The three post operation flow tests carried out on 12 May, 10 July and 18 Dec at a local hospital showed a considerable improvement. The procedure was slightly different as at each visit flow rate was measured three times by continually drinking water until urination was essential. After each test the residual volume was measured by ultrasound. The average maximum flow rate for each visit was 18 ml/s, 23ml/s and 16ml/s.
For interest my IPSS score on 13 May was 13 – a drop of 12 from roughly six months previous.
Quality of Life After iTind
Before iTind, urine flow necessitated the seating position and toilet visits were necessary around 14 times per day with perhaps 2 visits during the night. Most visits were of an urgent nature and sitting down was adopted to aid bladder emptying and the toilet visit interval was around one hour. A week or so after removal of the iTind the frequency had dropped to 9 plus and eight months after was around 8 per day.  Results would be even better with less diuretics such as tea, coffee and alcohol.
Finally as an indication of the improvement and as previously mentioned, on a holiday cruise around five years ago I had to visit the toilet 4 times during dinner lasting say 90 minutes.  Over the past year I have undertaken 3 cruises consisting of 5 weeks to Canada, 4 weeks in the Caribbean, Cuba, Mexico and 2 weeks in the Black sea plus recently 2 weeks in Madeira without any difficulties whatsoever including the flights, and by recollection without leaving the dining room once.
My message to BPH sufferers considering the iTind:
Go for it – you will live a much more convenient life!
This testimonial was sent to us by a patient who had an excellent experience and is typical for a majority of patients. As regards pain, it is important to know that some men complain of severe discomfort and also pain for the 5-7 days that the device is in place. Over-the-counter pain tablets are effective. The discomfort ends soon after the iTind is removed and BPH symptoms are greatly reduced with further improvement continuing over the following months. The vast majority of patients have no further problems.
To summarise, a man with BPH who chooses an iTind  will undergo a 5 minute procedure under sedation to fit it, then 5-7 days of discomfort before the device is removed. After that many trouble free years are to be expected.
In the worst scenario, if the symptoms are not relieved, any of the alternative treatments remain options.    
If you would like to discuss options for the procedure, do not hesitate to call Robin Penberthy at Genesis Medical on 020 8451 4100